Front Ride Height

Create differences in your front-end grip with your ride height.

with Justin Stefani
Technical Director at Compkart

Keeping with the theme of front-end adjustments, we're going to dive into the basics of ride height. Ride height is simply how close or far away your frame is to the racing surface. To adjust, you will use your allotted washers to move your stub axles either up or down inside the frame's c-joint. Take note that some stub axle washers can come in shapes that make it mandatory to put them in a certain order.

In a standard COMPKART setup, there are two 4mm washers -- one placed above and one place below the stub axle. Check with your manufacturer or supplier if you don't know what your kart's standard setting is.

High Ride Height

Figure 1

To raise the ride height, you'll need to drop your stub axles. To do so, we'll move a washer from below the stub axle to above it (figure 1). Start by removing your stub axle bolt and catching the washers in your hand as you remove the bolt. Now place an additional washer on top of the stub axle and put your stub axle bolt back in. This now lowers the stub axle in the c-joint and raises your frame, creating high ride height.

Raising the ride height creates more front-end grip with more weight transfer to the front. It's commonly used in low-grip or wet conditions, but also can be used to create ground clearance if you're at a circuit where you use a lot of the curbing.

Low Ride Height

Figure 2

Lowering the ride height takes the exact same procedures as what we detailed above, except now you'll move an extra washer below the stub axle (figure 2). Start by removing your stub axle bolt and catching the washers in your hand as you remove the bolt. Now place an additional washer below the stub axle and put your stub axle bolt back in. This now raises the stub axle in the c-joint and lowers your frame, creating low ride height.

Lowering the ride height works the front tires less, reducing some grip from the front end. It's commonly used for lower horsepower categories or in high grip situations at a fast, flowy track so the grip won't work your tires as much.

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